Tuesday Morning Collaboration #sol20

Today I write in isolation, but not alone.  I write in the March Slice of Life Challenge, writing each day in March with my fellow writers under the guidance of Two Writing Teachers.  You can still join us, writing is healing and communal.  If you’re reading this, check out this blog about what to do right now. Today I’m inspired by the meeting I should be having right now, but am not…

Tuesday Morning Collaboration #sol20

March 17, 2020

Happy St. Patrick’s Day.   I hope you’re still sleeping, but I’m thinking of you. If we were together, I would have probably brought some soda bread and green napkins.  We would have ‘coffee’.  Well, A. would have had a yeti of tea and M. would have had a iced coffee from Dunkin’.  A. would close the door and say good morning.  She might be empty handed.   Sometimes she waits for a good idea and then writes it on a stickie with a borrowed pen.  M. would open her fancy notebook, 1/2 sized. Her flair color matching her mood or hoped-for mood.  We’d huddle and we smile at each other.  How are you doing? 

I’d have a list in my notebook of things I wanted to talk over with you.  Hopefully, I’d hesitate to see if you had something in mind.  Most times you do.  I’d have my units on the table, my phone, my notebook, my coffee.  Sometimes I don’t write in my notebook until you go away.  Sometimes I draw something in there or on a stickie to illustrate a thought or an idea.  Today I have a few things I want to talk over in this virtual space. What I don’t want to talk over is the reality and uncertainty of our current situation.  So I’m going to ignore it… for now.

Screen Shot 2020-03-17 at 7.50.23 AMFirst, I’m excited by the work A. has been doing with the ‘narrative task’ and creative writing in her room.  She’s excited too.  I’m sure she’s told you about it, but can we just talk about how it works and how we might expand it and will it work again next year.  I do love these books we chose for the Book Madness… I want to get the other Boston Marathon title.  Wait, back to the idea.  She began with Girl Running, taking four scenes after she had read and loved it with her class and let them ‘blow up’ the scene.  I wish I had some samples of her students’ writing, but I kept the photo copies of the spaces where she stopped.  I would stop at those pages and talk about why they are good.  Yes, they do illustrate the story arc. What a strong reinforcement!  She chose the rising action where Bobbie was crouching behind the forsythia right before she joined the race.  Then she chose the place where she revealed she was a woman runner.  We probably look these over and talk about presenting them to the students.  Would we ask them where this was on the story arc?  Would we let everyone pick the place where they want to write?  What guidance might we add to the narrative task?  What if we paired this book again for the compare and contrast using Her Fearless Run or The Girl Who Ran.  I’ll bring out Drawn Together. I hear that this book is a student favorite.  This book requires some interpretation by the students.  I want to hear what your students were thinking.  A. used this book as well.  I wasn’t there for this lesson.  We might look through the book together and think about how to present it.

I’ll mention how the newer teachers are struggling with the MCAS unit I drafted.  I will admit that some of it is my fault.  It needs some revision between the calendar and the day-to-day.  I’ll talk about some coaching I’ve done there and what I hope to do in the future.

Our time’s getting short but I want to share this idea that I saw on twitter. Screen Shot 2020-03-17 at 8.10.55 AM Did you see that retweet I posted about using the Snack Attack video for character change in the essay?  Remember when we hoped that some videos might be used on the state tests?   Even that year we did the PARCC.?  We could show the video.  Love it and then think about character change.  What if we did that work in start-and-stops with table groups or two partnerships together?

Our time is past over as usual.  There’s so much to share and talk about.   I read City Spies yesterday, but don’t really want to promote a mystery in fourth.  It did have a strong story arc with lots of attempts.  It would be interesting to see how the students mapped it and what they thought the climax was.  That’s always so tricky.  I saw that M. read Coyote Sunrise.  I love that book, great character change, but it’s so sad.  What next?  I am thinking about reading the historical fiction book, They Bicycle Spy.  I know you have already read it, but I was wondering if I could create a mentor arc of another historical fiction for talking it over with the other teachers.

Have a great day!  Glad we had this time together…

Keep Writing #sol20

Keep Writing #sol20

March 12, 2020

Unexpectedly I was asked to cover for kindergarten class one day last week.  I dropped in and the teacher said, the students have just started writingGreat I thought, I love writing.  

Immediately the cry went up.  What do I writeI  need help!  The young writers were all sitting at their tables with a 3 step How-to page in front of each student.  Peering at the illustrations, the first was a child mixing something.  The second illustration was a oven.  The last illustration was a child frosting or putting sprinkles on the cookie.

Oh, wait!  I said.  Let’s plan out our writing together.  What is this about?  Baking cookies was the unanimous response.  Ok, I thought.  Here we go.   Let’s look at this first picture.  What do you think you do first when you bake cookies?    

Mix the dough! the kindergarten writers respond.

Great! Let’s look at this picture.  (Oven) What’s happening?   I don’t see the cookies. I wait for them to explain. They are quick.  The cookies are in the oven.  I smile.  Oh, I say, bake the cookies.

There’s one more picture.  What happens after you take them out of the oven?  

They look carefully at the picture.  The room is quiet for a minute or two.  Look at the picture. What’s happening?  They look closer.  One of them offers, he’s putting sprinkles on the cookies.  Nods of agreement around the room. The room explodes with talk.

The pencils start moving.  As I notice writers are struggling to get started, I pull a few into a group on the rug in front of the phonics chart.  What did we want to write first?  Mix the cookies, they respond.  Let’s think about M-i-x.  I stretch out the word.  What letter makes the mmm?  As we begin to work through the sounds, they begin to tentatively write, and then help each with the sounds.  I move away letting them keep going.

Other students begin to finish.  I’m done. I’m done. begins to pop up around the room.  Oh.. I say.  You’re not done!  What else could you teach me about?  Do you want to write on the back of this paper or do you want another piece to write your next How-To? 

There we go starting our next phrase,  I move again table to table, talking over their steps.  It’s fun to talk over with them their how-to plans.  One young writer says, I don’t know what to write about.  Hmm… I say,  Did you get up this morning?  Giggles ensue.  Yes! she says.  Ok, what did you do first?  Step by step we talk through telling her mom what she wants to to eat.  Then what?  On she goes telling me about eating breakfast.  I tease her about just leaving it sitting on the table. No!  she say, I clean up my place and then I get ready for school.  

There you go!  You’re all set.  Get writing.  

It goes on like this until the magical hour I didn’t know I was going to have is all up.  I say thank you to those brave writers and head toward the door.  Wait!  they press into me.  Take my writing!  Take my writing!  

I’ll make a copy and bring it right back to you. 

I hold each one carefully.  Read them again and cherish each of them and slip them into my unit book to be shared and shared and shared.

(Un)Solicited Reviews #sol20

(Un)Solicited Reviews #sol20

March 9, 2019

What happens when a second grade class of book reviewers find out that I don’t have the latest book in Jory John and Pete Oswald’s series, The Cool Bean?  They set out to convince a literacy specialist in the best way they can… they write a stack of book reviews.  So here straight from the second grade is the reason that I (you) should run out and buy this book.

This was pretty convincing until I read this line.

Why are you still reading this go and buy this book!!!!

It’s difficult to say what I love most about this situation and why after nearly a month, these reviews are still traveling back and forth in my teacher bag.

Another thing that I like (in) this book is that after they were nice to Little Bean he starts to be kind to other(s). Another reason I think this book is good is that there (they’re) get(t)ing along again… it teaches you that everyone is cool and sometime people are nice and kind.

Straight from my teacher bag into my heart and into my mentor text files.  These second graders don’t know it yet, but they have the makings of some literary essayist.  Quick retell, character traits, lessons learned, they are putting it together.  So is their teacher.

These showed up on my desk silently one day without notice.  Just a sweet little stack of writing gems.  I know you wish you could read them all again and again as well.

Here’s one final picture to tide you over.

For the month of March , I will be participating in the Slice of Life Challenge (#sol20) sponsored by Two Writing Teachers. I will be slicing each day for 31 days inspired by my work as a literacy specialist and coach, my life, and my fellow bloggers.  This is day 9.

Time to Reflect #sol19

Screen Shot 2019-12-09 at 4.31.14 PM.pngTime to ReGroup (& Reflect) #sol19

December 10, 2019

We’ve come to the time of the year when it’s time to take stock.  Prepare for our New Year’s resolutions so to speak.  Take some time to consider how far we’ve come from the aspirations of early fall to the reality of early winter.  A new season of school is upon us.

We can no longer attribute difficulties to ‘summer loss’ or ‘adjusting to the school year’, now it’s all on us (collectively).  What are the reflective questions to ask ourselves?

For me, so much about this tenth year in this same school is similar and yet it feels so different.  With a dramatic shift in the personnel around me and the allocation of my time, I find myself carefully considering many things about both my yearly trajectory and my day-to-day practice.  I believe this happens to those of us who work in education quite frequently.  Mostly, it’s a good thing.

It’s a good thing because the less stagnant we become, the fresher we are for those around us.  I have a lot of experience in literacy and elementary school, but I work best when I approach each new challenge with fresh ideas and a full toolkit.  Success is more often the outcome when I listen, I observe, I carefully consider, I remain true to my overall philosophies of learning, and then, only then, I offer suggestions.

We have a child study team at our school, similar to many other RtI practicing schools.  I am well known for taking copious notes and always offering up some out-of-the box ideas along with the standard fare.  Thinking about something we haven’t tried keeps us focusing on the uniqueness of each student, each classroom, and each situation that comes our way.

One challenge that remains stubbornly consistent over the last years is spelling.  Spelling?!?  Not word-solving in reading to any extent, but spelling.  If I am being honest, I used to think, spelling?  That’s what spell-check is for.  It will work itself out with technology and practice.  Through happenstance, I decided last week to take spelling head-on.  What can we consistently do to improve the spelling of individual students and our students overall?  Is this perception or reality?  How is this global issue related to others that seem to be perennials in the landscape of our school lives?

What do we do when we try to solve a problem?  We get right in there.  But for some reason (I think I know why),  I decided this time, this time it wasn’t going to be about me swooping in and solving a problem by offering a solution to a teacher and most especially, a student.  This time was going to be about me listening, reflecting, creating agency in the student herself.  So instead of asking, what’s up with this?  I asked,  what are you already doing well?  Hey, kiddo,  spelling (insert difficulty here) is a big elephant of a thing.  What do you think you are doing ok?  How do you know?  Then, and only then, did I ask, what do you think you might work on right now? 

Here’s what it looked like on paper.

IMG_5455It isn’t magical.  It isn’t an amazing piece of insight.  Honestly, it might not work.  The look on the student’s face as she created this alongside me was everything.  I hope it will be a game-changer, but I’m at peace if it isn’t.  There will be something else to try, to tweak, to discuss.  What all of this is about is moving forward, giving something a go, building agency and mindset and all those things that will stay with a learner long after she’s left me behind.

Here they are, her ideas in my handwriting.  As we move forward, I hope she will see it as her success as well.

 

img_0602 I write in the company of the writing community created by Two Writing Teachers.  I thank them and all my fellow writers for building agency in me and helping me feel my own success.

The Truth about Teaching #sol19

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The Truth about Teaching #sol19

October 29, 2019

This morning, I had a plan, a plan to join some third graders as they began to explore persuasive writing and speeches.  A wonderful new book on my desk, I began to reread to plan out my stop and talks.  It occurred to me after I had read about ten pages that this particular book wasn’t really going to work.  #hatewhenthathappens   All my other persuasive text for the most part were loaned out.  What to do? 

I dug out another book.  Screen Shot 2019-10-29 at 1.52.47 PM

Truthfully,  I’ve been thinking about a way to use it.

I arrive at the class with a sharpie, my big notebook, some index cards, an anchor chart and this book.  Ok, kiddos, I say.  You were writing opinions yesterday right?  (mediocre answers) . So today,  let’s see how this author tells us his opinion.  

The book is amusing, full of side comments by the bears.  5 pages in I ask,  what kind of book does this seem like to you?  The kids look at me incredulously. Perhaps they think their thinking isn’t quite right.  Finally a brave students says, it seems like informationalYep, I said, the author is telling us a lot of facts about bearsWonder why?  Let’s see if we can figure it out.   We finish the story and I ask again, what was the author hoping we would do?  Again, hesitantly they say,  he wanted us to know about bears and teach other people.  Why? I asked.   Silence… then… he wanted us to help the bears.  Why?  So they would have food and some place to live.

Then I ask them, is there something you could teach me about that would make me care more about it?  Some students stayed on the bears.  But two stole my heart.

IMG_5229

So Grandpas don’t get embarrassed.  

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People should close their trash cans so plastic doesn’t go into the water and turtles can be safe. 

They may need finesse, but I’d say these people know how to have an opinion.

As I circle the room, one student is writing facts down about guinea pigs.  Hmm, I say, are you thinking people should own guinea pigs?  In my old school, I had a guinea pig.  You did?!?!  the table group erupts.  We should have a class pet!

We sat down as a group to have a chat about the opinion we should have a class pet.  First they want to discuss what kind of pet. Rattlesnake, monkey, dog, cat, guinea pig. They think about the pros. We can pet it when we are sad.  It will be something to talk to.  It will make kids want to come to school more.   And then,  one student says, there are reasons why we shouldn’t have a pet.  Sure, I say.  What?  We have to clean up after them.  People are allergic.  Counterargument.  Not taught, just caught. Messy, all over the place, student led learning.  Do you think we can really get a pet? they ask.

 

#whyiwrite #sol19

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#whyiwrite  #sol19

October 22, 2019

Why I write? 

{shuffles papers; straightens desk; washes out coffee mug; stacks post-its… sighs deeply}

If I were going to write an essay (perhaps I am) on why I write,  I would say that I have to,  it’s a habit I’m building, and I 200% think it makes me a better educator and coach.  But how?   It seems completely magical in some ways, how I wake up at 3 a.m. and write a whole page in my blog fodder journal about what I am desperate to write.  Lately less that 80% of those ideas make into the confines of this blog.  These ideas wither and die in my notebook, not seeing fruition because I’ve lost the rhythm of writing.  Not to worry.  Even as I typed those words, I thought to myself… it will come back.  

It will come back because I’m tired now, but I’m also inspired.  I’m inspired by all I read, all the conversations I have, what I see,  what I try, and what I see others try.  I’m inspired by my partnerships and my trials,  my colossal fails and my almost wins.  I’m inspired by my friends, virtual and right here, who notice when I don’t write.  I’m inspired by… ideas.  There are so many!

When I began…

I formally saw myself as a reading teacher that taught writing.  I never considered writing. When I began blogging, I didn’t consider blogging actually writing.  Instead, I read and read and read.  I wrote in margins, on stickies, and in notes about things I had read, but I didn’t write about what I was thinking.  I held back.  Like many or perhaps all, my young writing was filled with criticism and endless, endless revision until the voice on the page sounded not at all like my voice to me.  I hardly hear those negative voices now in my head.  I write like I hope I inspire others to write… freely.

When I began writing in earnest a few years ago, believing that my blog was writing. Believing myself to be the type of writer who blogs because she wants to discover ideas, discuss ideas, and stretch out ideas until they shine like new pennies and reflect their effervescence far and wide.  It feels amazing to write my ideas down, to push the curser back as I reconsider, to mine my little notebook for a tiny crumb that comes to me as I’m driving or cooking, talking or reading.  

Why do I write?  I would be a fraud if I taught writing instruction to teachers and facilitated writing to young writers if I hadn’t struggled through an idea myself, if I hadn’t looked up to think about the next words that might come after those words waiting on the page.  As I write,  I learn more about what it means to be a writer.  I learn more about the process of writing, the way words string together, the way writing about something can empty your heart and fill it at the same exact moment.

Why do I write?  I think I have come to view writing in the same way I do reading now.  I might be writing at my ‘just-right’ level, but there’s always room for a bigger amount.  There’s always room for a stretch. That’s how I became a better reader, more and more along with thinking and thinking.  Same concept with writing, more and more along with trying, experimenting, pushing, editing, fixing up, and letting go.

Why do I write?  Now I know that, no one is looking at my words and saying… you know, she’s not really a writer.  No one is thinking…what makes her think she can write?  They are thinking as I do when I read someone else’s writing, I never thought of it that way or that’s exactly what I was thinking!  

So I write.  I’m a writer.  Why not?

img_0602I wouldn’t be a blogger without the encouragement of my dear friends, Clare and Tammy, who saw me as a writer long before I could say those words myself.  I write in the shadow of an amazing community of writers that inspire me to ‘better’ every day.  Thank you to the amazing inspiration that is all of the writers at TwoWritingTeachers.

 

Paint Chip Poetry #playingwithpoetrynpm

A paint chip poem inspired by Elisabeth Ellington who was inspired by an I am exercise in Susan Goldsmith Woodbridge’s book, Poemcrazy, Freeing Your Life with Words.

Paint chips are amazing. Go on over to the hardware store and load up. I want a second set right now. Devoid of verbs, paint chip names abound with adjectives and nouns. To complete this exercise like the mentor, I transposed one title and added articles, prepositions and the sentence stems from the exercise. This was fun.

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Poemcrazy exercise

Just pile on words. Don’t think. See images. Daydream with words. Wander. Go crazy defining yourself…

 

 

 

 

What I Am

I am seasoned salt,

the pencil sketch of early September.

The clear vista of my heart

is a stargazer on a September morning.

I am every growing season

keeping promises of a new day on

a distant shore.

I don’t know soft secrets or solemn silence.

I’m a blazing bonfire in the

Chicago fog,

a summer dragonfly at a lawn party.

I want to be a rolling pebble,

A sand pearl, a hush in beach grass.

Nail Polish Name Poetry #playingwithpoetrynpm

Playing with poetry further, I took Elisabeth Ellington’s nail polish name poem as a mentor. I have a box of nail polish, apparently ripe with racy innuendo. This wouldn’t be an elementary school project. Here it is. Each line of poetry is a nail polish name in my collection.

Nail Polish Poetry #playingwithpoetrynpm

April 7, 2019

bahama mama

aruba blue

haute in the heat

berry naughty

bikini so teeny

The girls are out

Breaking curfew!

wicked wild (nude)

no more film

e-nuf is e-nuf!

Notebook Saturday: Drop In #sol19

For the month of March , I will be participating in the Slice of Life Challenge (#sol19) sponsored by Two Writing Teachers. I will be slicing each day for 31 days inspired by my work as a literacy specialist and coach, my life, and my fellow bloggers.

Notebook Saturdays

Through my work as a literacy coach,  I have teachers that I meet and collaborate with throughout the week. Some teachers will come with questions, sometimes we plan out what we will work on the next week, sometimes I have a teaching technique or skill  I’ve noticed or a suggestion. I keep a journal entry of each meeting to keep me thinking. 

Notebook Saturday:  Drop In #sol19

March 23, 2019

She rushes in the book room, paper in hand. Do you have a few minutes? she asks.  I turn from my computer, my head full of other thinking.  I hesitate, only for seconds.  Sure, I say, What’s up?  

She places a carefully constructed sheet on my table.  I scan for a moment.  Oh,  new strategy goals…  She has been very careful.  I wish I remembered her carefully constructed titles for the groupings.  In my mind I was already translating them… word solving, ok.  Two word solving groups.  (Middle word)   Now I’m remembering… Mind Movies,  Dialogue.  I called one Fluency.  Oh yes,  she called it sound like talking.   There’s one cryptic group that I’ve called LL.  Hope she remembers who and what.

Looks like you’ve got it thought out. 

I don’t know how I’m going to fit it all in.  

(Sigh) (This is a talk I can do on the fly)  Let’s talk it out.  Let me get a piece of paper.  Legal pad sheet ripped off the pad.  Stickies.  Pencil.  Let’s go. Ok,  how many groups can you fit in a workshop?  Two? 

I think I can fit three, she says.  Hmmm.  I quickly draw a grid, talking as I go.  Let’s plan for four days and then you can have an extra for things you notice that week or just whip around conferring.  I pause…  Let’s start with your word solvers.  

We begin working through groups talking strategic times, timing, configuration, methods as we go. My paper begins to look like a football play book.  (As if I’ve seen one of those)

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Quickly we work through the groups. Perhaps start the week with Word Solvers.  Maybe this word solving group can be seen by your partner teacher and you can just do table conferences.  

On we go.  Four days a week for the word solvers. She’s been running a shared reading group with them.  I suggest a gradual release. 2 minute teach, 8 minute watch and coach.  Then later in the week, run both groups at the same time, centering herself and going back and forth.

She’s ready for a stretch in technique.

Her Mind Movie group and Dialogue group perhaps two days each.  That might be a good try for Shared Reading.  Interactive Read Aloud, she says.

Mind Movie group?  What level?  Lish?   You could teach into story mountain.  Time line? she asks.   Four squares.   Maybe a little higher level character work.  Iris is the kind of person who…character trait.   

We talked through book club ideas quickly.  Double partnerships, book club talk.

We include a bonus slot for research or teaching into current unit lessons.  I draw a poorly executed trash can fire.  She looks up.  Sometimes fires happen.  You need space for that.  

Then I say something off the cuff in closing. That’s a mantra, she says.  Write it down. 

IMG_3800 (1) Laughing,  I write it down as I say it again.

Off you go.  

 

My apologies to Jennifer Serravallo for my fast edit of a technique I learned from her.  You can read more about this grid planning technique in Teaching Reading in Small Groups.  

Routine #1 #sol19

For the month of March , I will be participating in the Slice of Life Challenge (#sol19) sponsored by Two Writing Teachers. I will be slicing each day for 31 days inspired by my work as a literacy specialist and coach, my life, and my fellow bloggers.

Routine #1 #sol19

March 12, 2019

morning routine #1

Morning Routine #1

“Come on,  Lily.  Outside,” I call to no answer.  Walking down the hall I call again, “Outside!”  Still nothing.  I peak over the top of the couch and a pair of dark brown look up at me.  “Let’s go, right now, outside.”

Reluctant feet hit the floor with two thuds.

I am waiting at the door.

Out we trudge.

Already thinking and stewing about the day ahead, I walk to the edge of the sidewalk and turn the corner.  I hear the sound of feet breaking through the crusty snow.

Crunch. Crunch. Crunch.

My gaze looks beyond the yard to the sun breaking through on the horizon.

For a moment, I think about its beauty.  Where else is there that shade of red mixed with the soft blue of the receding night.  For a moment, I am transfixed.

Then the day begins to encroach.

First the gentle trill of birds. Are there birds returning?  

Then I begin to hear traffic.  Cars moving along a nearby road and

I am shaken back into the swirl of daily cares.

“Come on,  Lily.   I have to get to work.”

Gentle steps crunch through the snow and back onto the walk.  I have already turned but I hear the soft jingle of her jewelry as she follows behind.

This is our routine.