5/31 Monday Book Shelf #sol19

Screen Shot 2017-06-27 at 8.32.28 AMFor the month of March, I will be participating in the Slice of Life Challenge (#sol19) sponsored by Two Writing Teachers. I will be slicing each day for 31 days inspired by my work as a literacy specialist and coach, my life, and my fellow bloggers.  This is day 5. 

 

5/31  Monday Book Shelf #sol19

March 4, 2019

If you are reading this, you might have the same problem I do.  Bookshelves bursting at the seams and an organization system that works one day, but not the next.  Welcome to my Monday bookshelf, where I will organize a stack of books in the whim that strikes me that day.  Hopefully this stack will resonate.

Stack #1  Mirrors and Windows for Shared Reading and Read Aloud

Providing for reflection of the school experience for some and empathy creating conversations and reflection for all through shared reading and read aloud can be a multipurpose tool in the classroom.  With so much content, wise choice of books help us discuss Social Emotional Learning goals along with decoding and comprehension skills. 

These book provide a glimpse into the lives of children who are struggling to find their place in this world.  Isn’t this true for many? 

Screen Shot 2019-03-04 at 7.57.09 AMA Boy Called Bat was this year’s Global Read Aloud pick for the younger students’ read.  What to say about Bat?  Bat struggles are in some ways universal and in others particular.  He is sensitive to sound, loves routine, has objects for comfort, avoids eye contact, and is incessantly inquisitive.  When Bat’s mother fosters a baby skunk, Bat learns a lot and by sharing that moves closer to friendship.  What I love is that everything isn’t smoothly resolved in the end. A beautiful read aloud for any class perhaps first through third grade. Screen Shot 2019-03-04 at 7.57.40 AM

Screen Shot 2019-03-04 at 7.55.22 AMBeatrice Zinker Upside Down Thinker is much more in-your-face kind of reading.  Beatrice’s classmates and teacher can get frustrated with her ways.  This is a book about her trials and missteps, her attempts and successes.  Again,  I like that everything isn’t perfectly resolved.  I am wondering if reading a chapter or a book talk might spark an interest in a small book club in grades two through four.  Screen Shot 2019-03-04 at 7.56.02 AM

Screen Shot 2019-03-04 at 7.51.27 AMStuart Goes to School and Stuart’s Cape are particularly new books, just new to me. Stuart is starting to school and has some real and exaggerated fears about what might happen.  Unlike the my other choices,  there is magic involved here.  The magic, however, is not necessarily responsible for  Stuart’s change in thinking.  An easy chapter book for reluctant transitioning readers, possible shared reading text for second graders, a book reviewed book for a book club.  Many possibilities for this short series.  Also magically written by Sarah Pennypacker, a perennial favorite. Screen Shot 2019-03-04 at 8.06.35 AM

Screen Shot 2019-03-04 at 7.53.56 AM.pngFox the Tiger, a book award winner for 2018, is a charming beginning reader about a Fox that decides to be a tiger.  His plan,  his friends’ reactions make for a surprising deep well for character change and feeling discussion.  Perfect for shared reading in a late kindergarten and any time in first grade.  Screen Shot 2019-03-04 at 7.54.19 AM

I might label this bin.  Be Unique, Be You.

 

 

 

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What I Took Away from It’s All About the Books #IMWAYR

9780325098135 Ten Things I Took Away from It’s All About The Books

April 20, 2018

Tammy Mulligan and Clare Landrigan’s new book, It’s All about the Books is a wake up call to every elementary classroom, school book room, literacy specialist, and administrator.  Buy more books and figure out how to redistribute the books you have so that every book is getting into the hands of students.

Here are some lessons I’ve learned or been reminded of by this amazing book.

 How many guided reading sets do we need? 

Break up the guided reading sets and make them into more interesting groupings. Keep the sets that will help teachers teach specific genres or specific skills in strategy groups.

Level, but don’t make it about the level 

It’s true at the beginning reading levels, students should and need to be reading at level.  However, making the level how we identify books,  identifies readers too.  Those kiddos don’t want to read an ____ level book,  they want to read a book about tarantulas or dolphins or whatever.   Make those groups be fun and funny and interesting.  Some book bin labels from our revolving bin collection:  Fun, Fun, Fun,  We Go Out,  99 Problems, I Got a Dog.   Our books are leveled A/B,  C/D, E, F/G,  H/I, but those level aren’t how we identify them.  IMG_1182

 

Move those books around!

Bring them to faculty meetings.  Make a bin swap date once a month for K-2.   As a coach, tote them to collaboration meetings, PLC, and whenever you meet with teachers.

 

Involve everyone in the DIY

Just because I live in the literacy center,  I don’t own it.  Involve everyone.  Ask questions:  What do we need?  What do we have?  What organization would help? What’s hot?

Find out what is out there in the building

Do a complete inventory.  Find out what you have to work with.  Include classroom libraries that were purchased by the district, mentor texts, classroom sets, EVERYTHING.

Organize a book swap 

Organize a book swap for teachers.  What books do you have in your room that your students consistently can’t read, don’t read, are too high,  too low,  ready to move on.  Maybe those books are just what someone else is looking for.

Organize a book swap for students

Have student bring in outgrown books.  Set up shopping tables by general grade level or interest.  Have kids take however many you can spread out.

Create a shared document 

Create a shared document for recommendations, for groupings, for books.  What would be a good next purchase?  What should a classroom teacher build up?  What is a must own?

Start in one place to organize

Let’s say your teachers all want to work on folk and fairy tales.  Create a section in your book room that is especially for those titles.  Same with animals.  These are always needed and popular.  Think about what you need organized as a group and start there.

Encourage everyone to switch up their offerings 

A good time to switch is over breaks or at the end of units.  Keep some from the last that didn’t quite get around to everyone or to use for transition.  Another good time to switch is after assessment time when you want to match readers with books that are more right for them.

School favorites

Think about vertical focus.  Is there a title that wants to move from grade to grade.  Picture books are not just for kindergarten and first grade.

Help Given

Hang a sign in the door of the book room, Help Given.  Have kiddos come by to discuss book groupings with you and help put away.  Have PLCs meet where the books are.

 

These are just a few of the amazing ideas inside Clare and Tammy’s great book, It’s All About the Books.  This is a must read for all teachers of reading because it really is all about the books.

 

 

Books for the Kids in Front of You #sol18

Books for the Kids in Front of You  #sol18 #IMWAYR

Immigration Edition

March 5, 2018

I am thankful for our school librarian for being my tireless exploration partner in book acquisition.

Our school in multicultural.  Perhaps yours is too.   We were exploring topics for our historical book clubs in grade 4,  I questioned what topics could students relate to without a significant amount of historical knowledge.  Can we learn about social justice in our modern times in elementary school? Many books I have purchased this year and wrote about before carry a growth mindset and empathetic message, but what about the experience many of our students have of immigrating from another country.  Here are some of our current favorite picture books.  51kqn6wGIcL._AC_US218_.jpgThis may be my current favorite book.  While it doesn’t specifically discuss immigration, these young bear brothers seek shelter from the storm.  Asking each animal neighbor one by one,  they are turned away by all.  Remaining positive, the bear brothers create their own shelter using the one gift received from a young fox, a lantern.  When the fox’s home is threatened, they come asking for aid from the brothers and are warmly welcomed into their small shelter.  So many wonderful messages in this beautifully illustrated book.

Where-will-i-live.jpg

We debated this book purchase as the book doesn’t turn away from tough information.  This book has photographs of children many in situations that we often want to shelter each other from,  sleeping on the streets,  asking where will we live.  In a school where we do meet and nurture students in transition, this is a delicate topic.  This book examines this in a gentle, unflinching way

816jNphsaIL._AC_UL320_SR270,320_.jpgThis book takes a different approach to the immigration experience in a intimate family way.  In a moment that many children may have, fishing with their families,  a father tells the child how he fished in his home country.  Beautiful illustrated and simply told. A Caldecott nominee.

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I hope reading and enjoying this book will give children I know an idea about welcoming those new to our community.  One girl, adrift and awash in experiences that she can’t understand meets another girl in the park. She smiles in greeting and the new girl is distrusting at first.  Over days, she looks for the smiler and then finally see her again.  The welcomer teaches the new friend to swing.  As the book continues,  the welcomer begins through objects to assist our new settler in learning the words she speaks.  I love this story full of everything we hope from community.

81pXXl2ZebL._AC_UL320_SR288,320_.jpgThe simplest of this set,  I’m New Here is a straightforward book about arriving fresh in a new spot.

Not reviewed here, but worth a mention are some lovely novels including.

Same Sun Here

Inside Out and Back Again

Esperanza Rising

Day  of 31 days of writing. Thank you to my fellow bloggers for inspiration and encouragement and toTWO WRITING TEACHERS for creating this opportunity.  Read more amazing blogs and join the writinghere.