Friday Follow (up) #sol19

For the month of March , I will be participating in the Slice of Life Challenge (#sol19) sponsored by Two Writing Teachers. I will be slicing each day for 31 days inspired by my work as a literacy specialist and coach, my life, and my fellow bloggers.

Friday Follow(up)  #sol19

March 22, 2019

IMG_3793He comes more willingly down.  Eyes bright when they meet mine.  A little more eager to find his book and his writing.  A little less shy to ask if he can finish his chips or his cookies on the way down the hall.  A little less defensive.

It’s been months since our get-togethers started.  At first he would start each little time with I’m a really good reader.  

Yes, I would say,  I know you are.  Doesn’t it help a little bit to have some quiet time to work on your reading and writing?  I know it helps me. 

He wasn’t buying it.

Then he rewrote his opinion piece… and he loved it.  We typed it up.  Can I take a copy of this home? he asked shyly. And one for my teacher? 

We found a funny book we both loved, reading and talking about a chapter most days.  That Sugar, she’s the kind of chicken that likes to be tricky.  

But then just when everything was going smoothly,  yesterday on his way out the door, we had this conversation.

This is the kind of work you can do when you’re reading.  You’re the kind of reader who knows how have an idea about a character and then find evidence. 

My teacher and I always work together. 

This is the kind of work you’re ready to do on your own. 

He stops in his tracks and turns to look me full in the face.  I lean over so that our eyes meet.

My mom and dad think I’m really, really smart. 

I also think you’re really, really smart kiddo(name withheld) 

He smiled a little smile and was on his way.

But I wasn’t on my way.  My heart ached and I felt sharp tears forming.  Did he think he was coming to work with me because we (I) thought he wasn’t smart?  This was terrible.

So today.  I took a deep breath and went back to pick him up.  I opened his classroom door and said, Why don’t you bring your writer’s notebook and your novel today?  

He came willingly. He smiled up at me.  We walked down to the literacy center talking about our day so far.  When we sat down I asked him.  Hey, kiddo (name withheld),  I have been thinking about you telling me that your mom and dad think you’re smart yesterday.  Why did you say that?  

He turns.  Those gorgeous brown eyes look at me with complete trust and honesty.

I just wanted you to know they think the same thing you do.  

We smile at each other and get to work.

We are going to be just fine.

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Friday Follow: Twitterverse #sol19

For the month of March , I will be participating in the Slice of Life Challenge (#sol19) sponsored by Two Writing Teachers. I will be slicing each day for 31 days inspired by my work as a literacy specialist and coach, my life, and my fellow bloggers.
Friday Follow:  Twitterverse  #sol19

Screen Shot 2019-03-13 at 7.09.33 AMAs a literacy coach,  I am often creating my own professional development on the fly based on what I think might be helpful to my learning community or things that I seek to make a closer connection to through deeper thinking.  However,  there are only so many hours in one day.  Twitter is my first web-based learning tool.  As you can see,  I joined twitter in 2009.  I was trying to remember what caused me to join.  I think I must have attended a professional development at that time that encouraged me to follow authors and speakers that I learned from.   While twitter can be maligned,  I find that when I limit my content to the people I follow,  twitter can be a wonderful place to find information, to read quick articles or see examples of work with students, and finally,  to showcase ideas that you have or amazing things you have seen.

This weekend I will be attending the TCRWP Reunion.  I know I will add some twitter follows to my twitter page anticipating that those tweets that will teach me more.

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My twitter is mostly based in my professional life, except for the occasional passion following like @suethetrex, based in the Field Museum in Chicago.  I follow staff developers at TCRWP like @clemenkat to learn the latest in what she’s seeing and working on in literacy.  I follow my blogging pals because most of us connect our blog to our twitter feed.  There is a sharing element in your blog construct where you can have your published blog posted simultaneously on your platform and on twitter.  

Screen Shot 2019-03-14 at 8.37.31 PM.pngMost days I carry a camera around with me to my collaboration meetings, intervention times, co-teaching moments.  As I pass down the hall,  I snap a picture of an art project.  As I visit a classroom,  I take a picture of work that students are doing. These pictures make it to my twitter page to celebrate student and their teacher’s work.  This is a way to showcase what the teachers in my building are doing that is so right for students.  Here is one example from this week of a kindergarten class in the persuasion unit.

Screen Shot 2019-03-14 at 8.42.00 PMI learn from twitter.  I can read blogs, follow teachers, staff developers, authors, fellow writers.  I use the hashtag #smktwitternotebook so I can quickly find posts that I want to keep.  You can also save photos from twitter to your photos.  Most of the tweets I save this way are curriculum related.

Over nine years,  there have been many tweets read, sent, contemplated, and saved. #twitterlove

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday Follow: Blogs Edition #sol19

For the month of March , I will be participating in the Slice of Life Challenge (#sol19) sponsored by Two Writing Teachers. I will be slicing each day for 31 days inspired by my work as a literacy specialist and coach, my life, and my fellow bloggers.

Screen Shot 2019-03-07 at 7.32.55 PMFriday Follow:  Blogs Edition #sol19

March 8, 2019

As a literacy coach,  I am often creating my own professional development on the fly based on what I think might be helpful to my learning community or things that I seek to make a closer connection to through deeper thinking.  However,  there are only so many hours in one day. Each day I take time out to read blogs even when it is not March. Instead of recommending blogs to you, here’s a few ways that blogs move my practice forward.

In all started with twitter, but that is a story for another day.  I will say that I find some blogs I follow because they are posted on twitter feeds.  I recommend you post your blog on twitter and also repost other blogs you find interesting and helpful on your twitter feed as well.  You can connect your twitter to your linkedin and twitter under the sharing bar.

Blogs are where I up my game.  I read a lot of literacy related blogs, both book reviews and professional practice content.  Many of our fellow slicers are published authors and their blogs are full of their amazing ideas.  I am sure you all follow Two Writing Teachers year round and soak up all their delicious ideas.  There are many other professionals through out our community that also blog about their practice, their latest reads, and other people they follow.

These blogs that I have followed either in my Word Press Reader or through email, also send me down the road of other bloggers.  Bloggers are generous folks and often give credit where it’s due when they find an interesting concept to expand upon or another blog that inspires them.

As I have said in many comments over the last week,  blogs are wonderful mentor texts.  Like all mentors, the more you read, the more you learn about them as a craft.  There are short tight ones like Brian Rozinsky’s, blogs that chronicle family time like Stacey’s slice or Jess’ or Darin’s.  There are amazing practiced slices by wordsmiths like Alice NinePoetry, photos, and now a cartoon.  Brilliant mentors who inspire me when I am uninspired and fill me full of ideas.

My radical suggestion is to read the entire list of blogs on the slice list one day.  Some you will just read through and offer a like. Some you will notice a sparkling turn of phrase, an interesting metaphor, a technique you haven’t tried.  Others will spark a memory of family, of childhood, of experiences past that will have you thinking for days.  You will find some blogs to follow.  Blogs that speak to you,  teach you, inspire you.  Just waiting to be read.

 

Friday Follow: Podcast Edition #sol19

Screen Shot 2019-03-01 at 6.20.52 AM Friday Follow:   Podcast Edition #sol19

March 1, 2019

As a literacy coach,  I am often creating my own professional development on the fly based on what I think might be helpful to my learning community or things that I seek to make a closer connection to through deeper thinking.  However,  there are only so many hours in one day.

To that end,  I am often listen to a book or a podcast on my commute to and from school.  I know I’m not alone in that, many of my colleagues recommend new ideas to me.  A couple of podcast have been transformative to me over the last year or so.

The first may be familiar to many other literacy professional, the Heinemann Podcast.  This podcast has been the fodder for many blogs over the last year.  Recently,  it has been helpful to get me into some professional texts that either I haven’t purchased… yet or that I have purchased but can’t seem to get around to reading.  Particularly powerful was a recent was Lucy Calkins discussing her new book Leading Well and Cornelius Minor reading the introduction to his new book, We Got This.   I had the opportunity to see Cornelius Minor speak at Heinemann in their summer teacher day two years ago when this book was in development.  This is a very powerful podcast for all that will encourage you to be semi-brave.  While all beneficial, another one I recommend whole-heartedly is Debbie Miller speaking about her book, What’s the Best That Can Happen?  I’ve written about this book in one of my weekly slices.  So powerful.  These podcasts are around twenty to thirty minutes long,  a typical commute time for me.

My second podcast recommendation is The Yarn alternately hosted by Travis Jonker and Colby Sharp and sponsored by School Library Journal.  These very quick podcasts are usually a quick interview with a children’s author about their craft.  This podcast is perfect for finding out tidbits to share with your students.  Both Travis and Colby are easy to listen to and I believe each podcast is usually 10-15 minutes long. Look for their year review “brocast” (longer) where they discuss their favorite books of 2018, a don’t miss.

So my Friday Follow for this week,  podcasts.  It makes me sound and feel a whole lot smarter.

Please share your favorite podcasts as well.

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Thanks to my inspiration,  Two Writing Teachers including Kelsey, Stacey, Lanny, and all the rest along with my favorite fellow writers.  We got this!  Thirty one day writing streak, Day 2(ish).