Summer BookaDay Update #IMWAYR

Summer #bookaday Update #IMWAYR

June 23, 2019

As usual,  I stuffed my book bag with a load of books on my way out the door last Friday.  It’s a hodgepodge of professional texts that have been languishing on my shelves and kid lit that are reads and rereads.  Also don’t tell Mr. K how many times the Amazon van has dropped by our house as Pernille’s Global read aloud books trickle in.  I seriously need to make better friends with my local library.  They mostly seem to be titles I need.  So here is week one’s round up of summer book a day.

Screen Shot 2019-06-24 at 8.18.31 AM.png  Some Places More Than Others This is my #1 book right now for novels. A charming story about a middle schooler searching for her roots and wings.  Imbedded in the story is a wonderful family history project ripe for the trying.   I want to give this book to everyone I know to read and treasure and pass on.  Full disclosure:  I read about this from Colby Sharp.  He says ( and I agree) this will be a Newberry contender.  When Angelina and I went to Wellesley Books educator appreciation,  I snagged the ARC of this book, so it’s going to her next.  See my Goodreads profile for an amazing quote from this book.  Sidenote:  this book has a connection to several biography picture books I read last year, so I see it sliding into a quick read aloud.

 

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Next up is this amazing, much anticipated book,  How to Read a Book by Kwame Alexander, art by Melissa Sweet.  I ordered this book in February and it was worth the wait. Everyone is writing about this book and for good reason.  Visually beautiful, it’s lyrical prose will put in a lot of categories in my professional library,  beginning of the year, how to’s,  and literary life.  I can’t wait to read and share this book with many adults and students.  It will be the book I give to our new principal to welcome him to our learning community.

 

Screen Shot 2019-06-24 at 8.34.37 AM.pngScreen Shot 2019-06-24 at 8.35.13 AM.pngThe next two books Little Night Nochecita and Viva Frida are not new books.  Viva Frida was a Caldecott honoree and a Pura Belpré award winner in 2015.  Yuyi Morales is an author study pick for this coming Global Read Aloud.  (September 30, 2019)  This year I am determined to be ahead of the game and have these books read and book talked throughout our learning community before then.   I have read and own the other books in this picture book study.  Viva Frida will work best when the author’s notes at the end are read first.  There is an audio of these notes as a preview on Amazon.  Little Night Nochecita has bilingual text which only adds to the magic of the beautiful dreamy illustrations.  I love that the picks for this picture book study are varied.  I have a vision of using them to show young authors that you can write about many different things in many different ways.

Screen Shot 2019-06-24 at 8.47.15 AM.pngAfter listening to Booksource’s webinar on diverse books for classroom libraries,  I tried out a trio of mysteries with Lark and her brother.  The second in this series,  Lark and the Diamond Caper features this brother and sister duo finding their place in their social group and celebrating their uniqueness.  This book, by Natasha Deen, an own voice author, isn’t my favorite mystery, but I want to add more mirrors to our selections in the Nate the Great/Cam Jansen category.  It will be interesting to see if the students are drawn to these titles.

 

Monday,  Tammy Mulligan read us Astro Girl,  a charming story that includes girl power Screen Shot 2019-06-24 at 8.57.14 AMreferences and a can-do mindset.  As Tammy said,  this is a great book to encourage I-got-this.  I love how the father gently discusses what might be involved using affectionate displays and the little girl responds with I can do that.  The surprise ending might be a connection to a book collection to read and display. This book is also soon to be published. Screen Shot 2019-06-24 at 8.56.04 AM.png

 

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2019-06-24 at 9.08.45 AM.pngMy last book of my Monday-Monday run is also an older book,  The Fabled Fourth Grade of Aesop Elementary School by Candace Fleming.  It has been kicking around in my random novel basket for years.  I must have acquired it in a collection somehow.  I was thinking that it would add to my poetry novel set, but it really isn’t a novel in verse.  What it is a twist on Aesop’s fables.  Each chapter has a story about something that happens to this fourth grade class with a bad reputation and the corresponding Aesop lesson learned.  It’s dated for sure, published in 2005, but I am thinking it might work for a read aloud during a folk tale unit if you had it in your collection, perhaps as a mentor text twist for students.  Truthfully some of the language and situations are not current, but like other older titles might be fresh for a new audience.

Up for this week are some professional texts and a few more short novels.  All suggestions welcome.

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